Tag Archives: wellness

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Avoiding Weight Gain After Breast Cancer

Excess weight can be an unwanted side effect of chemotherapy, but it doesn’t have to be. By Beth W. Orenstein Reviewed by Judy Mouchawar, MD, MSPH | everydayHEALTH Breast cancer survivors with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer gained more weight within five years of treatment than women who didn’t have the disease, […]

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Finding Your New Normal

After the diagnosis and treatment, cancer survivors must learn to adjust to and recognize their body’s new normal. From skin changes, hair loss, and the physical (and psychological) effects of radical surgeries, Dr. Lindsay Sortor answers a host of questions about adapting to your body after cancer. (more…)

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Lend Your Voice

Every woman’s cancer experience is different especially when it comes to whether she wishes to share her diagnosis and cancer journey. Rose Gerber gives some insight on her road to cancer advocacy and tips on how to know if you’re ready to become a cancer advocate. (more…)

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Just Say No to Indoor Tanning

No compliment is worth skin cancer. Indoor tanning became all the rage several years ago and has now become a common part of some women’s beauty regimens. However, there is now clear evidence linking indoor tanning and skin cancer. Read on for healthy alternatives. (more…)

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Don’t Suffer Silently

Often we focus more on the physical effects of cancer and cancer treatment, while ignoring the emotional challenges that can arise from a cancer diagnosis. Speaking openly about your experience in individual counseling, a support group, or simply with a friend can help immensely. Read on for more advice and information about cancer trauma. (more…)

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The Friendship Factor

We all have basic needs, and it boils down to this: food, shelter, love. Yes, love-and not just romantic love but love in general-the kind that comes from community, connection, and friends. In fact, teenage girls have long known what scientists are just figuring out: we can’t live without our girlfriends.